Abortion
The reasons why women have abortions are diverse and vary dramatically across the world. Some of the most common reasons are to postpone childbearing to a more suitable time or to focus energies and resources on existing children. Others include being unable to afford a child either in terms of the direct costs of raising a child or the loss of income while she is caring for the child, lack of support from the father, inability to afford additional children, desire to provide schooling for existing children, disruption of one's own education, relationship problems with their partner, a perception of being too young to have a child, unemployment, and not being willing to raise a child conceived as a result of rape or incest, among others. An additional factor is risk to maternal or fetal health, which was cited as the primary reason for abortion in over a third of cases in some countries and as a significant factor in only a single-digit percentage of abortions in other countries. An American study in 2002 concluded that about half of women having abortions were using a form of contraception at the time of becoming pregnant. Inconsistent use was reported by half of those using condoms and three-quarters of those using the birth-control pill; 42% of those using condoms reported failure through slipping or breakage. The Guttmacher Institute estimated that "most abortions in the United States are obtained by minority women" because minority women "have much higher rates of unintended pregnancy. Pro-Life vs. Pro-Choice. 10 Abortion Arguments: 10 Arguments For Abortion, 10 Arguments Against Abortion. A majority of people in the United States believe abortion should be legal and regulated. These facts fly in the face of both sides of the argument. The left wants abortion to be free and easy to obtain. The right wants abortion outlawed. There is an obvious solution to this problem if the leadership of both parties would just step forward. But they don't.

States’ Abortion Curbs Put Supreme Court to the Test

5/21/19
from The Wall Street Journal,
5/17/19:

Will Roe v. Wade be overturned? It may be up to Chief Justice Roberts, Trump appointees.

Sweeping state-level abortion restrictions present a direct test of whether the Supreme Court is willing to revisit Roe v. Wade, the landmark abortion-rights precedent that has spurred deep divisions for nearly 50 years. States with antiabortion legislative majorities have long been weighing how to prompt a Supreme Court review of the 1973 ruling, but generally have preferred a strategy aimed at reducing the procedure’s availability through incremental restrictions that hamper providers, or by forbidding late-term abortions.

During this state legislative season, lawmakers in several conservative-led states have proposed bills that are designed to challenge Roe in court, and governors have been more willing to sign them than ever before.[Alabama & Missouri]

Several states—Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi and Ohio—recently passed bans on abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, which can be as early as six weeks. While conservative states have been moving to push boundaries with their new abortion restrictions, liberal ones including New York have taken steps to ensure abortion rights within their borders in case Roe falls or is pared back. “You really have the red and the blue nation at odds,” said Peter Charles Hoffer, a legal historian at the University of Georgia.

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