Government Shutdown
There is a need to pass a bill extending routine government funding after a stopgap bill expires March 27. Without an extension, a partial government shutdown would occur. Congress must pass this spending bill, called a continuing resolution or “CR,” which would continue spending after Sept. 30, 2013, the end of the 2013 fiscal year. As it stands now, the government’s legal authority to borrow more money runs out in mid-October, 2013. According to the Bipartisan Policy Center, if that date arrived on October 18, the Treasury “would be about $106 billion short of paying all bills owed between October 18 and November 15. The congressionally mandated limit on federal borrowing is currently set at $16.7 trillion. The debt limit has been raised 13 times since 2001 and has grown from about 55 percent of Gross Domestic Product in 2001 to 102 percent of GDP last year.

Trump Signs Budget Deal, Stopgap Spending Bill to End Shutdown

2/9/18
from The Wall Street Journal,
2/9/18:

A coalition of centrist House Republicans and Democrats combined to end the year’s second government shutdown.

President Donald Trump signed a two-year budget deal Friday morning, along with a stopgap spending bill to end a brief government shutdown. The measure passed in the House hours earlier, in a 240-186 vote, overcoming opposition from both conservative Republicans opposed to boosting federal spending and Democrats worried its passage would diminish their leverage in the coming debate over immigration. After months of funding the government through short-term patches, a coalition of centrist House Republicans and Democrats combined to end the year’s second government shutdown and resolve a fiscal fight that had spilled over from 2017. The Senate had passed the spending package hours earlier in a 71-28 vote. The president signed the bill about 8:30 a.m.

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