War on Religion
If you doubt there is a War on Religion, consider this. Every day in America we hear of high school cheerleaders who can't use religious words like faith, Jesus Christ, hope and love on banners; valedictorians at high schools are told not to include religious messages or risk punishment; proselytizing in the military is grounds for a courts martial; desecrating war memorials with crosses because they are religious symbols; HS football players cannot put memorial crosses on their helmets; and on and on and on. Tell me that this action by the Chinese government is not the same thing that is happening here! "Chinese police reportedly surrounded the town of Donglu on Sunday to prevent its residents, the majority of whom are Catholic, from holding a procession in honor of the Virgin Mary." Religious prejudice and intolerance is growing in Europe often under the guise of tolerance. It is exactly the same thing that is happening here. It makes the War on Religion seem like such an insufficient label for what must really be going on, a totalitarian fear and censorship of religious activity throughout the world, including America. Religion and Public Life in America makes the case that "today's secular culture views orthodox Christian churches as troublesome, retrograde, and reactionary forces. They’re seen as anti-science, anti-gay, and anti-women—which is to say anti-progress as the Left defines progress. Not surprisingly, then, the Left believes society will be best served if Christians are limited in their influence on public life. And there won’t just be arguments; there will be laws as well." Wake up America and demand the return of Religious Freedom in America. The country was built on the principle. The 1st Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America grants freedom of worship, speech & press; the right to petition the government & to assemble peaceably. Specifically with regard to "religion" it states: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." Many on the left have tried for at least 50 years to re-write history with regard to "separation of church and state" and to downgrade the religious beliefs of the founding fathers. This quote should satisfy both questions: "Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports ... and let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle." George Washington, Farewell Speech, 9/17/1796 (from "Being George Washington"). See the dialogue from both sides below.

The Benedict Option

2/18/17
from The Wall Street Journal,
2/17/17:

Longing to lead more religious lives—and wary of the wider culture—a growing number of traditional Christians are creating their own small communities.

[caption id="attachment_117688" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Our Lady of Clear Creek Abbey, Hulbert Oklahoma"][/caption]

hen the first few monks arrived in Hulbert, Okla., in 1999, there wasn’t much around but tough soil, a creek and an old cabin where they slept as they began to build a Benedictine monastery in the Ozark foothills. Dozens of families from California, Texas and Kansas have since followed, drawn by the abbey’s traditional Latin Mass—conducted as it was more than 1,000 years ago—and by the desire to live in one of the few communities in the U.S. composed almost exclusively of traditional Catholics. There aren’t many jobs nearby. The nearest bank, grocery store and coffee shop are nearly an hour’s drive on country roads. Yet many residents choosing to live near Our Lady of Clear Creek Abbey say it is worth the sacrifice. “Our goal in moving here was to form our children’s conscience and intellect in a particular way, without society taking that authority from us,” said Mark Wheeler, one of the first to settle on the outskirts of the monastery more than a decade ago.

The 100 or so people living here are part of a burgeoning movement among traditional Christians. Feeling besieged by secular society, they are taking refuge in communities like this one, clustered around churches and monasteries, where faith forms the backbone of daily life. Similar villages—some Roman Catholic, others Orthodox or Protestant—have sprung up in Alaska, Maryland, New York and elsewhere, drawing hundreds of families. As the proportion of Americans without any religious affiliation continues to grow, more Christians are considering where they can go to live out their faith more fully. It has been dubbed the “Benedict Option,” in homage to St. Benedict, who as a young man left the moral decay of ancient Rome to live in the wilderness.

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