ObamaCare (PPACA)
A simple summary of where we are with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) or ObamaCare. The Supreme Court ruled on June 28, 2012 that the law was not unconstitutional, but offered confusing explanations within its decision. “The Affordable Care Act is constitutional in part and unconstitutional in part,” Roberts wrote. First, The Court upheld the federal takeover of 1/6th of the US economy and ObamaCare implementations will continue. On August 1, 2012 the controversial HHS contraceptive mandate took effect. Second, the Court said that it is reasonable to construe what Congress has done as increasing taxes on those who have a certain amount of income, but (who) choose to go without health insurance. Such legislation is within Congress’s power to tax.” But, “the individual mandate cannot be upheld as an exercise of Congress’s power under the Commerce Clause. That Clause authorizes Congress to regulate interstate commerce, not to order individuals to engage in it.” Third, as for the Medicaid expansion, "that portion of the Affordable Care Act violates the Constitution by threatening existing Medicaid funding," Roberts wrote. "Congress has no authority to order the States to regulate according to its instructions. ... The remedy for that constitutional violation is to preclude the Federal Government from imposing such a sanction." So there you have it; ObamaCare continues as a tax, the mandate is unconstitutional (but because the program continues as a tax that item is irrelevant), and the Medicaid expansion cannot be forced on the states. Open enrollment for the new federally run health-care exchanges are scheduled to start Oct. 1, 2013, with all Americans having access to affordable health insurance options effective January 1, 2014. See timeline here. Find your state's Health Exchange here. State-by-State Insurance Information is available at this site.

How the Senate Health Bill Differs From House Bill, Obamacare

6/23/17
from The Wall Street Journal,
6/22/17:

Senate released its legislation; vote expected next week.

Now that Senate Republican leaders have released their health bill, it is possible to see how it diverges from the House-passed version and from the 2010 Affordable Care Act. The Senate proposal could change before it is voted on, which leaders hope will be late next week, but the basic elements are likely to remain. Helping the Uninsured What the ACA does: People who don’t get insurance on the job can get tax credits to offset their premiums, and in some cases to lower their out-of-pocket costs, for plans purchased on the insurance exchanges. The credits take into account income, age and the local cost of insurance. What the House bill would do: People without employer-sponsored coverage can get tax credits, but they would vary largely based on age. For many people, the credits would be smaller than under the ACA. Individuals can use the credits for plans sold anywhere, not just on the exchanges. What the Senate bill would do: The Senate’s approach is closer to the ACA’s. The tax credits would be larger for people with low incomes, those who live in areas with high medical costs, or older Americans. As in the House bill, many people would get smaller tax credits than under the ACA.

More From The Wall Street Journal (subscription required):



365 Days Page
Comment ( 0 )
Leave a Reply
Name*
E-mail*
Comment