Government Regulations
To quote Jamie Dimon of JP Morgan Chase before Congress on June 13, 2012, "Lets not throw the baby out with the bathwater", ... "I believe in strong regulation, not necessarily more regulation".. He clarified by saying that continuing to add regulation on top of bad, ineffective regulation would just make it more complex and costly and less effective, meaning be a little thoughtful about the regulation that you impose on business. That is the common sense approach. People are concerned when they hear that Congress invites industry experts in to discuss development of laws and regulations for fear of watering down the law/regulation. So, that means they would rather have politicians in Congress who DO NOT understand the industry, develop a new law/regulation on their own? That hurts the industry, the economy and the employees and clients of the industry in question. If Congress is the "executive" representing the people of the US, they should use industry experts and make strong and proper executive decisions that create effective laws with with the best interests of the country in mind, and with out political maneuvering.

Trump vs. the Deep Regulatory State

11/19/17
from The Wall Street Journal,
11/17/17:

The tempestuous president is overseeing a principled, far-reaching reform of agencies that had exceeded their constitutional writ.

Federal regulation has been growing mightily since the early 1970s, powered by statutes that delegate Congress’s lawmaking authority to mission-driven executive agencies. Beginning in 2008, the executive state achieved autonomy. The Bush administration during the financial crisis, and the Obama administration in normal times, decreed major policies on their own, without congressional authorization and sometimes even in defiance of statutory law. President Trump might have been expected to continue the trend. As a candidate, he had railed against imperious Washington and promised to clear regulatory impediments to energy development and job creation.

With some exceptions (such as business as usual on ethanol), and putting aside a few heavy-handed tweets (such as raising the idea of revoking broadcast licenses from purveyors of “fake news”), President Trump has proved to be a full-spectrum deregulator. His administration has been punctilious about the institutional prerogatives of Congress and the courts. Today there is a serious prospect of restoring the constitutional status quo ante and reversing what seemed to be an inexorable regulatory expansion. Consider three leading indicators.

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